Parigi / romance restaurants

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  The picks below are  TIME OUT favourite, tried and tested venues

for romantic evenings à deux, whatever your budget.

More info @http://www.timeout.com/paris/en/restaurants/romantic-restaurants

Verjus

Verjus

American team Braden Perkins and Laura Adrian started out in Paris running a well-regarded supper club, ‘Hidden Kitchen’, so it’s little surprise that Verjus – opened in 2012 after rave reviews paved the way for a full-blown restaurant – hasn’t quite lost its word-of-mouth feel. You reach the small, stylish dining room through an unmarked iron gate on the Rue de Richelieu, up some well-worn steps and through a plain grey-painted door…

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Opera
La Tour d'Argent

La Tour d’Argent

This Paris institution is regaining its lustre following the death of aged owner Claude Terrail in 2006. In the kitchen, Breton-born Stéphane Haissant has brought a welcome creative touch to the menu, bringing in unique dishes such as a giant langoustine dabbed with kumquat purée and surrounded by lightly scented coffee foam. But he also shows restraint, as in duck (the house speciality) with cherry sauce and a broad bean flan…

 

5th arrondissement
Le Sergent Recruteur

Le Sergent Recruteur

In a modern-day gastronomic and architectural fairy tale, avant-garde Spanish designer Jaime Hayón and chef Antonin Bonnet, formerly of Mayfair’s The Greenhouse, have rescued a former pub on the Ile St Louis from a future of tourists and bad beer and turned it into a princess among restaurants. Stone walls and a medieval-inspired décor are finished with modern white and green touches that work with the changes in daylight…

 

Ile Saint Louis
Passage 53

Passage 53

You’d expect the cooking of France’s only Japanese chef with a Michelin star (two, to be precise) to be something a little out of the ordinary. But it’s not just what’s on the plate at Passage 53 that holds the attention. Shinichi Sato, who trained at l’Astrance in Paris and Mugaritz in Spain, has found the ideal space in which to showcase his talents, with this tiny space in one of Paris’s most charming locations…

 

9th arrondissement
Benoit

Benoit

If you have a picture in your head of a golden age of Parisian dining, it probably looks something like Benoit. Though the outside of the restaurant is fairly plain, it has a plum position just moments from the imposing Hôtel de Ville, and is set on the border of the Marais, today a humming area full of hip bars, cafés and boutiques. Inside is where the magic really happens…

 

The Marais
L'Auberge du 15

L’Auberge du 15

Top quality, serious classic French dining should be tried at least once on a trip to Paris. This doesn’t mean you have to spend thousands at big-name restaurants – there’s a new breed of bistros serving some of the best Parisian contemporary cooking at prices that, while not exactly cheap, won’t make you retreat to the nearest Quick drive-thru. L’Auberge du 15 is a little off the beaten track…

 

13th arrondissement
Le Train Bleu

Le Train Bleu

This listed dining room – with vintage frescoes and big oak benches – exudes a pleasant air of expectation. Don’t expect cutting-edge cooking, but rather fine renderings of French classics. Lobster served on walnut oil-dressed salad leaves is a generous, beautifully prepared starter, as is the pistachio-studded saucisson de Lyon with a warm salad of small ratte potatoes. Mains of veal chop topped with a cap of cheese, and sandre (pike-perch) with a ‘risotto’ of crozettes…

 

Eastern Paris
Spring

Spring

American chef Daniel Rose was one of those who led the charge on a breed of restaurant that is now to be found everywhere in Paris, in more or less successful incarnations. All the ingredients of the place will now be familiar to regular restaurant-goers: the open kitchen, the set multi-course menu that changes daily with the market produce, the feeling of being somewhere simultaneously laid-back and special, chic and modern while concentrating on quality ingredients…

 

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