Róisín Murphy, a Disco Queen Ruling Her Own Galaxy

0

The Irish innovator, Róisín Murphy, has been putting her own spin on glittery music for two decades. In a year full of dance-pop releases, she’s returning to shake things up yet again.

Every few years, a rogue disco moment slips into the mainstream: Madonna’s album “Confessions on a Dance Floor.” The Abba-based film “Mamma Mia!” Daft Punk’s tune “Get Lucky.” But in 2020, disco isn’t an outlier — it’s been saturating nearly every corner of the pop universe. Dua Lipa and Lady Gaga released albums filled with glittery anthems, and Doja Cat’s “Say So” hit No. 1 on the Hot 100. In November, Kylie Minogue is releasing an LP simply called, yes, “Disco.” (The New York Times)

 

It’s a prime moment for the Irish dance-music supernova Róisín Murphy, an innovator who’s been putting a contemporary spin on the sound for two decades. On Oct. 2, she’ll release her fifth solo album, “Róisín Machine,” in which pulsing house beats and sleek strings are heightened by a cheeky theatricality all her own.

It’s a prime moment for the Irish dance-music supernova Róisín Murphy, an innovator who’s been putting a contemporary spin on the sound for two decades. On Oct. 2, she’ll release her fifth solo album, “Róisín Machine,” in which pulsing house beats and sleek strings are heightened by a cheeky theatricality all her own.

“I didn’t want to be as simplistic as a disco queen, because this music has come out of disco, proto-house and Goth, Throbbing Gristle and [expletive]Cabaret Voltaire and Donna Summer,” the Irish musician said of her new album. “It’s not just Black music, it’s not just alternative music, it’s not just dance music — it’s all of them things clashing and beautifully melding and becoming something that’s about individualism and freedom. This is what we need.”

Share.

Leave A Reply